There has been concern around COVID-19’s impact on fertility, which has contributed to vaccine hesitancy in reproductive-aged women. Evidence has been found to provide insight and answers to questions which some people have had around fertility and overall reproductive health.

Can a COVID-19 infection or a vaccination against COVID-19 impact fertility?

There is a growing body of evidence indicating that a COVID-19 infection (not vaccination) can impact fertility in the short term, especially among males. According to a study from the American Journal of Epidemiology, findings indicate that a COVID-19 infection in males may be associated with a short-term decline in fertility, but COVID-19 vaccination does not impair fertility in either partner.

Can a COVID-19 infection or a vaccination against COVID-19 cause sterility?

According to a study from the Fertility and Sterility Journal, they found that the SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) spike protein, whether from a vaccination or infection, does not prevent embryo implantation or early pregnancy development. Doctors and public health professionals can advise women of reproductive age that neither previous illness with COVID-19 nor antibodies produced from a vaccination to COVID-19 will cause sterility.

Are there risks for pregnant women if they get COVID-19?

There is clear evidence that there are health risks for pregnant women if they get a COVID-19 infection, although these risks seem to be reduced with Omicron. With both the Omicron and Delta variants, there is good evidence that appropriate vaccination against COVID-19 can protect people from severe illness. It is therefore important that people who are pregnant, are considering, or trying to get pregnant get vaccinated for COVID-19. There is no evidence that COVID-19 vaccines (of any brand) impact reproduction and sexual functioning.

In summary:

  • There is no evidence that COVID-19 vaccination reduces fertility, causes sterility or negatively affects pregnancy.

  • There is evidence that COVID-19 infection may reduce fertility in the short term, especially in males.

  • There is evidence that COVID-19 infection can be more serious in pregnant people.

Information sourced from:


If you have any questions or need extra support, we're here to help you anytime in any language. Simply start a chat with us via the home screen of the Sonder app.

Authored by: Dr Jamie Phillips MB ChB DIMC RCS(Edin) MRCGP(UK) FACRRM(EM)

Did this answer your question?